architecture students from Drury build a homeless shelter that plays with light and color | News

Architecture students from the University of Drury unveiled a new shelter designed and built to help the homeless community in Springfield, Missouri. Located at Revive 66 Campground, a local site offering overnight stays to homeless people, the project is designed to provide a more spacious alternative to the teardrop trailers primarily used in the field.

Photograph by Traci Sooter FAIA

Outside, the exposed framework and the cladding of the shelter are enlivened by a multicolored window forming a second skin around the patio. Inside, the cabin is designed with a double bed to accommodate couples and allow ADA-compliant accessibility for wheelchair users. Heating is provided by an electric radiant floor system, supported by highly insulated walls, floors and ceilings.

Photograph by Traci Sooter FAIA

“The structure honors the role of the community in helping to ensure the dignity of those who so often encounter the indignities of poverty and homelessness,” said Traci Sooter, a professor at the Hammons School of Architecture in Drury. “Through intentional design and the play of light, shade, color and texture in this little cottage, we hope it will not only provide a warm and safe place to rest, but one that will welcome and uplift its visitors.

Photograph by Traci Sooter FAIA

Sooter and his students have been involved in the project since October 2021, with Drury architecture students collaborating with their political science peers, who have contributed to the project by providing parallel research on the negative impact of policies and laws that disadvantage people. homeless.

Photograph by Traci Sooter FAIA

Revive 66 Campground is often used by those waiting to find permanent accommodation in the city, some of whom arrive at the grounds as early as 3 p.m. to find shelter. As a result, the team took the opportunity to engage with the community and listen to their concerns, including the lack of secure, wheelchair-accessible shelters.

Photograph by Traci Sooter FAIA

“I’ve had a lot of conversations with [the community]“Sooter told the Springfield News Manager. “And one of the things that really motivated me and made me come here when it was cold and rainy, one of the ladies waiting outside the fence kept saying thank you.”

Photograph by Traci Sooter FAIA

The project is one of many recent examples of architecture students undertaking design-build projects in their local community. Earlier this month, we reported on an ADU designed and built by architecture students in Rice, Texas, inspired by the state’s traditional Texas Dogtrot dwellings.

Photograph by Traci Sooter FAIA

In April, a team of Virginia Tech students and faculty completed the world’s first observation tower with innovative low-carbon wood, while separately, the University of Virginia campus hosted an exhibit of biomaterial structures created by architecture students and professors around the world. United States.

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