Architecture – Veranda Sky http://verandasky.net/ Sat, 02 Jul 2022 02:12:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://verandasky.net/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/icon-2022-01-31T140001.588-150x150.png Architecture – Veranda Sky http://verandasky.net/ 32 32 CTS Group Architecture/Planning PA awarded the Lucy G. Moses Preservation Award from the New York Landmarks Conservancy https://verandasky.net/cts-group-architecture-planning-pa-awarded-the-lucy-g-moses-preservation-award-from-the-new-york-landmarks-conservancy/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 16:26:21 +0000 https://verandasky.net/cts-group-architecture-planning-pa-awarded-the-lucy-g-moses-preservation-award-from-the-new-york-landmarks-conservancy/ Project description CTS Group Architecture/Planning PA was part of a team recently selected by the New York Landmarks Conservancy as the 2022 recipient of its highest honor, the Lucy G. Moses Preservation Award, for its work as a restoration architect on the historic building in cast: 55 Reade Street, New York, NY. This Italian/French Second […]]]>

Project description

CTS Group Architecture/Planning PA was part of a team recently selected by the New York Landmarks Conservancy as the 2022 recipient of its highest honor, the Lucy G. Moses Preservation Award, for its work as a restoration architect on the historic building in cast: 55 Reade Street, New York, NY. This Italian/French Second Empire style cast-iron transitional building is an individual New York City landmark. It was designed by famed architect John B. Snoop for the estate of grocer and tobacconist Stephen Storm. Its Mansard roof covered with slates surmounted by an iron crest signifies the prestige of this commercial structure.

The comprehensive restoration work included the repair and replacement of missing and deteriorated cast iron elements, including decorative columns, capitals and cornices; restoration and recreation of deteriorated sheet metal skylights; replacement of damaged slate roof; replacement of arched wooden windows as well as wooden storefronts.

The CTS group assessed all construction conditions guiding selective repair and replacement and recorded existing details of all features which served as the basis for replication of missing and severely damaged features. Scientific paint sampling served as the basis for repainting existing and new cast iron and wood elements. New wooden windows were fabricated based on detailed field drawings and the decorative iron crest was reproduced from remnant parts found at the site.

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The NSW Architecture Awards recognize the small and the large, the public and the private https://verandasky.net/the-nsw-architecture-awards-recognize-the-small-and-the-large-the-public-and-the-private/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://verandasky.net/the-nsw-architecture-awards-recognize-the-small-and-the-large-the-public-and-the-private/ SJB was the project architect coordinating three architectural firms at Quay Quarter Lanes, bounded by Loftus and Young Streets near Circular Quay. He also designed one of the award-winning buildings, 9-15 Young Street. But the apartment building at 8 Loftus Street by Studio Bright won the highest accolade for multi-residential architecture, the Aaron Bolot Award. […]]]>

SJB was the project architect coordinating three architectural firms at Quay Quarter Lanes, bounded by Loftus and Young Streets near Circular Quay. He also designed one of the award-winning buildings, 9-15 Young Street.

But the apartment building at 8 Loftus Street by Studio Bright won the highest accolade for multi-residential architecture, the Aaron Bolot Award.

Architect Qianyi Lim (right) with her partner, Ross Paxman, her daughter Linya, her mother Kooiying Mah and her sister, Xinyi Lim, in the house she designed one block back in Forest Lodge.Credit:Janie Barrett

The jury said the Quay Quarter Lanes project has contributed to a generational redesign of this gateway neighborhood to Sydney Harbour.

The project lasted six years, Haddow said. “Buildings become part of you,” he said.

“It’s a pretty intimate process of designing a building and getting it done. You get quite emotional. When you leave them, you feel like you’re sending your child to boarding school.

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The buildings are all brick, but with very different designs.

They are connected by intersecting walkways – one following the path of a colonial sewer – to create a village where people live, work and eat, and where the public feels free to enter.

A bubble tea cafe attracts local office workers to what was once a seedy road.

“They’re diverse, they’re intriguing and it’s like they’re talking together. It’s almost like a conversation taking place,” Haddow said of how the buildings are connected.

SJB was also one of three architectural firms, along with Durbach Block Jaggers and Tonkin Zulaikha Greer, to be awarded the prestigious Premier’s Prize for their work which brought Newcastle’s eastern cul-de-sac back to life.

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The Best New Home award, the Wilkinson Award, was won by Sibling Architecture for Stable House on land found in the densely populated Forest Lodge in Sydney’s inner south-west.

To add life and color, architect Qianyi Lim – also awarded this year’s Emerging Architect award – used tiled walls to add life and color to the home she designed to grow and adapt as her family changed.

One wall is covered with ultramarine tiles. Another wall is papaya. Others are teal and pink.

Other prizes awarded

  • The William E Kemp Prize for Education went to DesignInc Sydney, Lacoste+Stevenson and bmc2, architects in association, for Ultimo Public School.
  • The Milo Dunphy Award for Sustainable Architecture was won by Harley Graham for Phoenix House.
  • The Hugh and Eva Buhrich Award for Alterations and Additions to a House was won by Anthony Gill Architects for North Bondi House.
  • The John Verge Award for Interior Design has been awarded to 60 Castlereagh Street by Aeta Studio.
  • The Robert Woodward Award for Small Projects was won by Welsh + Major.
  • The Blacket Prize for Regional Architecture was won by Cox Architecture for Eden Port Welcome Centre.

The author was a lay juror on the jury deciding the Australian Institute of Architects’ NSW award for new housing.

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Why architecture buffs need to watch this Apple TV+ show https://verandasky.net/why-architecture-buffs-need-to-watch-this-apple-tv-show/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 17:33:00 +0000 https://verandasky.net/why-architecture-buffs-need-to-watch-this-apple-tv-show/ Pliny the Elder’s 2,000-year-old idiom, “Home is where the heart is,” may have been reaffirmed, while simultaneously and contradictorily redefined by AppleTVdocuseries, House. The term Roman author has been used throughout the millennia, signifying the emotional attachment one has to one’s family and place of origin, no matter where in the world it is. However, […]]]>

Pliny the Elder’s 2,000-year-old idiom, “Home is where the heart is,” may have been reaffirmed, while simultaneously and contradictorily redefined by AppleTVdocuseries, House. The term Roman author has been used throughout the millennia, signifying the emotional attachment one has to one’s family and place of origin, no matter where in the world it is. However, Apple House (no, not the one in Silicon Valley) appeals to a whole host of contributing factors that challenge the definition of what home really means.

The streaming documentary series explores and examines the themes and attributes that make up modern homes. From a sense of community and belonging to the genetic makeup of a home, the documentary series proves that there is more to a home than bricks and mortar, both literally and metaphorically. It delves into the heart of communities and investigates the pioneers behind some virtually magical structures, revealing some of the world’s most ingenious homes. Here’s why architecture buffs should watch House on Apple TV+ and tune in to the new season…

VIDEO OF THE DAY

Architectural innovation

Whether it’s the Catalan Antoni Gaudi, whose Art Nouveau approach to modern architecture shaped the beautiful complex city of Barcelona, ​​or the more simplistic functionalism of the Dane Arne Jacobsen whatever the style, architecture is an art form and architects can be true pioneers in structural art.

Related: These are the best Apple TV+ shows, ranked

House showcases the crème de la crème of the architectural world, highlighting the most innovative, imaginative and cutting-edge constructions and tapping into the best engineering minds that designed them. For two seasons, the program travels through the once deprived areas of South Chicago, from bamboo cathedral-like buildings in the remote forests of Bali, to the contemporary longhouse in Australia that embraces Mother Nature within its four walls.

The combination of architects and designers in this series utilized some of the more obscure natural materials and resources on offer, taking “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure” to new lengths, heights and depths. Space is never an issue either, as evidenced by the “Home Transformer” in Hong Kong; from what is seemingly a box in an apartment building, a cramped one-room studio is transformed into a multipurpose space by a moving wall design that simply alters the dimensions of the room and changes the floor plan entirely.

The originality of everything seen in the show is truly breathtaking, and the series is truly demonstrative of how home is what you make it, especially as evidenced by an Icelandic family setting up residence in a dilapidated old concrete factory.

For some, architecture merely draws a blueprint for builders and workers to erect. Buildings are everywhere, and often don’t symbolize anything at all to most people, nor have much real meaning. However, in Apple TV House, renovations generally represent community and shared space. Chicagoan Theaster Gates uses his drive to improve the lives of people in his area to craft and shape buildings that house multi-disciplinary events, from art exhibits in the archives and listening houses, to film events for black filmmakers promising in his black cinema. Accommodation.

Related: Best TV Series Coming To AppleTV+ In July 2022

The documentary series provides insight into how homes aren’t always just a place you live, but a place that gives back to its community and is perhaps overlooked by other parts of society and neglected by its local government. A place where passions, interests and ideas can be shared, where art can be exhibited and where an oasis of concrete, glass, metal and wood can be offered to those who may not have no access.

The house is a lesson in renewable resources

At a time when environmental activism is ignored by major world powers and massive reliance on fossil fuels jeopardizes the future of our planet, House tells the stories of people aware of climate change, using recyclable materials and renewable energy sources to build and maintain their homes.

The “Naturhaus” in Sweden, built mostly of wood, enclosed in a greenhouse-like structure to replicate a Mediterranean climate, and heated by wood felled by Anders Solvarm and his family, is a prime example of the type of resource recovery most show explores. House inspires and promotes freedom of expression in home design, but also in how people want to live their lives in an innovative, healthy and avant-garde way.

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Enterprise Architecture Industry Worldwide – Statistics & Facts – Indian Defense News https://verandasky.net/enterprise-architecture-industry-worldwide-statistics-facts-indian-defense-news/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 15:45:30 +0000 https://verandasky.net/enterprise-architecture-industry-worldwide-statistics-facts-indian-defense-news/ The report studies the outlook for the industry and examines what the next normal will look like. It is essential for companies that aspire to grow. It aims to provide investors, policymakers, well-established companies, start-ups and other interested market participants with the information they need to understand the global Enterprise Architecture market, by providing […]]]>

The report studies the outlook for the industry and examines what the next normal will look like. It is essential for companies that aspire to grow. It aims to provide investors, policymakers, well-established companies, start-ups and other interested market participants with the information they need to understand the global Enterprise Architecture market, by providing an in-depth overview of the market, the global enterprise architecture market and explore the key areas of the global enterprise architecture market. This report will help market players to identify where and how to invest in the market, enabling them to analyze the relevant segments of the global enterprise architecture market. The report examines market risks and opportunities along the global enterprise architecture market value chain, country-specific regulatory framework and policies, and other global enterprise architecture market influencers. enterprise architecture.

Key Enterprise Architecture Market Players:
Planview, Erwin, BiZZdesign, Sparx Systems, Mega, SAP, Interfacing, Software AG, Orbus Software, BOC Group, Evolution, YASH Technologies

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The report provides forecasts with econometric and expert-based projections for segment market size, macroeconomics, market share, consumer income, demographic variables. The forecasts such as regulatory changes, hard to predict events, legislative changes or key business campaigns are provided in the global Enterprise Architecture market report. The report helps market players to understand product portfolios, identify growth trends, anticipate risks, study market size and forecast, with a five-year view of the future of the global enterprise architecture and explore market scenarios related to covid-19.

Enterprise Architecture Market Types:
Consulting and planning services, Development services, Management services, Other

Enterprise Architecture Market Applications:
Open Group Architectural Framework (TOGAF), Zachman Framework for Enterprise Architecture, Federal Enterprise Architecture Framework (FEAF), Gartner, Others

Global Enterprise Architecture Market offers an overview of the global Enterprise Architecture market supply chain, key trends observed in the global Enterprise Architecture market investments, forecast and scenario analysis. The report presents different scenarios that bring out facts describing the situations of the global Enterprise Architecture market. The report provides forecasts with econometric and expert-based projections for market segment sizes and macroeconomic trends. The report studies major markets and provides future outlook of the global Enterprise Architecture market.

This report attempts to answer the following question about the global enterprise architecture market such as what is the growth rate of the global enterprise architecture market, which segment of the global enterprise architecture market? company holds the leading position, which segments are witnessing an upward trajectory throughout 2021, on which aspects the global enterprise architecture market will continue to grow and what is the revenue generated by enterprise architecture in the world 2020-2030. The report examines market risks and opportunities along the global enterprise architecture market value chain, country-specific regulatory framework and policies, and other global enterprise architecture market influencers. enterprise architecture.

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MW | whitehot contemporary art magazine https://verandasky.net/mw-whitehot-contemporary-art-magazine/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 23:22:49 +0000 https://verandasky.net/mw-whitehot-contemporary-art-magazine/ Domenico Romeo, ANM_14_1/1_TR_21 2021 Iron and nylon fabric 300x200x500cm, Photo Delfino Sisto Legnani. Courtesy of the artist. By ALICE ZUCCAJune 2022 Ranging from various forms of sign painting, installation and performance, Domenico Romeo’s work confronts the complex history and innate interconnection of structure and body, architecture and experience, language , identity and symbols. As he […]]]>

Domenico Romeo, ANM_14_1/1_TR_21 2021 Iron and nylon fabric 300x200x500cm, Photo Delfino Sisto Legnani. Courtesy of the artist.

By ALICE ZUCCAJune 2022

Ranging from various forms of sign painting, installation and performance, Domenico Romeo’s work confronts the complex history and innate interconnection of structure and body, architecture and experience, language , identity and symbols. As he traces the path of ancestral revelation through his modular structures, the artist introduces a sense of universal unity and continuous transformation, which is the ultimate meaning of his work. Fundamental in this sense, it also turns out to be the decision to codify all his exhibitions and works – which always take on an anthropomorphic connotation – almost sorting the different elements of his “opera system” into categories.

Starting with the title of his most recent series, ANM_PEX_002_BER_22, where ANM stands for “Souls” (“Anime” in Italian), these structures seem to indicate a real body made of bone (the soul of steel), skin (the fabric), and the soul (in essence and therefore in name), which functions through a solidarity between the elements and becomes almost like a living structure/organism and therefore no longer just elements but a system.

Thus, the coding in relation to the system acquires a fundamental meaning in Romeo’s work; for example, thinking of organs, we know what they are as themselves and their function, but only when put in relation to the human body (as a system) can they come to life , but as something which is different from them individually, they become a unit (which here takes the figure of man) but still exist as such and as themselves (heart, lungs, etc.).

Such an approach reinforces the idea that the “opera magna” in Romeo’s work is to be identified in the totality of the modular system itself, that is to say the whole of the ferrous material, the textiles and basic rules for assembling works. themselves which contribute to creating a unity of space and object, of language and form.

Domenico Romeo, ANM_14_1/1_TR_21 2021 Iron and nylon fabric 300x200x500cm, Photo Delfino Sisto Legnani. Courtesy of the artist.

Monochromatic colors, simple structures, technical fabrics and cold metallic materials, Romeo’s new sculptural installations are rational and intensely contemporary, avant-garde and courageous assemblages of geometries demolished then reassembled to make a visual equation of vertical and horizontal lines, while paying particular attention to the space they inhabit and to creative and gestural expression.

Roméo studies the transformation of our imaginary of reality into structures, controlled by reason and gesture, in order to then rediscover these same structures in a “certain” natural reality, inciting the viewer to rethink and re-examine the environment that surrounds him. surrounded. These huge steel frame-like works are inspired by signs and language, the artist combines both mediums to convey his message, focusing on symbols, rhythms and grids to develop his unique visual alphabet – he arrived at this particular form of expression after years of research and experimentation.

A research that draws on both the fields of art and fashion (a sector in which Romeo has worked for years as chief graphic designer of the famous brand Off-White). It also inspired him to deepen his knowledge of technical textiles, now an integral part of his artistic production, often used for his particular “flags”.

Domenico Romeo, ANM_9_1/1_TR_21 2021 Iron and nylon fabric 300x300x400cm, Photo Delfino Sisto Legnani. Courtesy of the artist.

The form of Romeo’s work is abstract in the extreme but contains a lot of linguistic information – industrial development, urbanization, norms and individuality. A high degree of balance is also found in Romeo’s work, where the rectangular assembly of hard steel seeks a balance at the level of industrial society between individuality and collective balance, nature and spirit, matter and consciousness.

The replicated structure forms the basis of a robust building and the infinite possibility of its development. These substances influence the way we live in urban society, as Karl Marx writes in Basis und Überbau: The mode of production of material living conditions, the general process of social, political and intellectual life. Amid the rapid rise of cities, there is perhaps a greater need for philosophical, cultural, political, and conscious ascension beyond the material. The artist aims to encourage the viewer to reflect on the deep structure of society and human nature.

Weaving together architecture, anthropology and the empirical nature of time and space, Domenico Romeo’s latest series “ANM_PEX_002_BER_22”, presented in Berlin at the Nadan Gallery (on view until July 29, 2022) is an experiential journey through three new large-scale installations that explore alternative approaches to understanding and unraveling the complex knots of identity between language and gesture, materials and codification, experience and revelation.

The exhibition route develops as an interactive spatial experience guided by three different sculptural installations connoted by a strong anthropomorphic and, at the same time, architectural component, both in the design of the works through a creative technique of assembling the sculptures (in which Romeo uses the lack of space between the elements to link the iron bars across the voids within, in order to transform the space) and by shaping the very space in which the structures are placed, almost as if the work itself, as it comes to life, begins to develop autonomously, mimics the artist’s gesture and, in its expansion, spontaneously and materially inserts itself into the empty spaces of the room’s perimeter.

Roméo’s sculptures are living structures which, in dialogue with space, draw paths, trace trajectories, and invite the spectator to recognize themselves in them and to undertake one or more spatial experiences. The installation opens up another field of possibilities through the uncertainty given by the presence of a crossroads (a dividing wall) and the resulting difference in experience depending on the choice of path taken, which may or may not lead to a giant “coffin keeper” an impenetrable tower three meters high, which perhaps holds the mystery of a revealing secret.

Installation view Domenico Romeo | ANM_PEX_002_BER_22 at the Nadan Gallery in Berlin, Photo Louis de Belle. Courtesy of the artist.

Crosses and nylon flags, appear here before us composing a synthetic forest of intersections, multiple and irregular, representing the inseparable and always changing union between the spirit, the body and the space in the quasi infinite flux of the contemporary horizon. Metal structures that form a skeleton with an essence; fabric flags like skin, leading to a discovery. Overall, a body is configured with its clothing and the artist, through its gestural alphabet – in particular through the stubbornly repeated crossing of metallic elements – also examines its account of the anti-symbol – and in doing so resorts by antithesis to the primordial symbol: “the cross”.

Archetype par excellence, present in all civilizations and religions, the cross is the direct expression of a common language that has always been shared in the collective memory. And it is specifically the shared “languages” and “ideals” that become flags, under which those who resemble each other gather – but the dual nature of symbols unites as well as divides (since the symbol is always already charged with meaning). The symbol precisely signals the gap between what unites and what divides.

In Domenico Romeo, the flag, which generally exists as something identifying (therefore already bearer of an identity), deprives itself of any symbol by becoming pure form, is the antithesis of itself so little that the “symbol “pure” (which inevitably designates something already overloaded with meaning), the “form” by nature is still clearly identifiable but never definitive, consequently open to new interpretations.

Romeo’s flag does not represent anyone, so paradoxically it becomes an invitation for everyone to identify with it. Individual works and exhibits are stripped of absolute meaning to give more vigor to the opera-system and its revelation through cathartic experience – ultimately, a personal revelation, which everyone can experience at the end of this path. WM

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Launch of a home automation course for architects and interior designers https://verandasky.net/launch-of-a-home-automation-course-for-architects-and-interior-designers/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 07:13:06 +0000 https://verandasky.net/launch-of-a-home-automation-course-for-architects-and-interior-designers/ The home automation industry’s only certification body, CEDIA, has launched a new professional development course for architects and building designers, designed to train them to be in the best position to meet the needs of their customers when it comes to smart home technology and lifestyle. Architects who complete the course also receive a formal […]]]>

The home automation industry’s only certification body, CEDIA, has launched a new professional development course for architects and building designers, designed to train them to be in the best position to meet the needs of their customers when it comes to smart home technology and lifestyle. Architects who complete the course also receive a formal CPD point.

CEDIA’s independent regional development consultant for Australia and New Zealand, Paul Skelton, explained, “Members of the design and build community are more frequently asked about smart home technology than ever before. . Basically, this new CPD presentation was designed to educate architects and building designers regarding smart home technology. It covers exactly what you can automate in a home, including blinds, lighting, entertainment, HVAC and security, why and when you need an integrator, and how you work with an integrator. It also gives architects one of the valuable 12 CPD points they must earn each year upon completion.

Members of the design and build community don’t need to bother learning how the technology works, but they do need to know who to call when the situation arises. This, combined with the fact that more and more homeowners expect smart home technology to be integrated into their homes, means that this technology has gone from a “nice to have” to an absolute necessity.

Skelton says, “Take the recent lockdowns as an example. As more and more people work from home, bulletproof networks are becoming a priority. Integrators are the people to call to make sure your client’s home is running as it should. This new course connects the dots between all the critical parties involved in achieving this goal. »

Architects who complete this course will come away with an understanding that smart home technology need not be intimidating and that if working with a qualified professional integrator, the technology need not have a negative impact on their design.

“They will also receive advice on how to find a qualified integrator and helpful tips on how to vet an integrator to ensure they are capable and competent partners. Where this course is different is that it deals with something completely different from other CPD presentations – it’s not about the National Building Code, paint, concrete, bricks or OSH. The technologies covered in this presentation are top of mind for many owners, helping architects work with integrators faster and more efficiently. »

CEDIA’s new CPD presentation for architects has been developed specifically for Australian design sensibilities by Skelton and a group of top-tier smart home professionals who work with all types of architects and building designers to bring highlight what is possible in the local market.

For more information on CEDIA’s new Professional Development Course for Architects in Australia and New Zealand, visit https://cedia.net/resources/design-build-pros/coi

Image: https://www.power-technology.com/comment/automated-home-and-the-power-industry-top-companies-named/

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Meet the inventive firm of LA TOLO Architecture: your next employer? | New https://verandasky.net/meet-the-inventive-firm-of-la-tolo-architecture-your-next-employer-new/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 15:49:32 +0000 https://verandasky.net/meet-the-inventive-firm-of-la-tolo-architecture-your-next-employer-new/ After last week’s visit to the Yabu Pushelberg in Toronto, we are moving our Meet your next employer series in Los Angeles where we find TOLO Architecture. Founded in 1998 by Peter Tolkin, the company was renamed TOLO in 2018 after the arrival of Sarah Lorenzen as director. Throughout its history, the practice has been […]]]>

After last week’s visit to the Yabu Pushelberg in Toronto, we are moving our Meet your next employer series in Los Angeles where we find TOLO Architecture.

Founded in 1998 by Peter Tolkin, the company was renamed TOLO in 2018 after the arrival of Sarah Lorenzen as director. Throughout its history, the practice has been acclaimed for its inventive approach to projects across a diverse portfolio. Archinect has already included the firm’s work in several of our architectural roundups, including facades, bathroom designs, interiors and homes.

Previously on Archinect: Next Up Arroyo Seco Weekend – Sarah Lorenzen & Peter Tokin

The company is now looking to expand by advertising Intermediate Designer Jobs on Archinect. For candidates interested in applying for the position and for anyone interested in learning more about life as an architect, we spoke with Peter and Sarah for a behind-the-scenes look at TOLO Architecture.

Meet your next employer is one of many ongoing weekly series showcasing the opportunities available on our industry-leading job site. Our Job Highlights series examines the intriguing and timely job opportunities currently available on Archinect Jobs, while our weekly digests organize job opportunities by location, career level and job description.

Red Carpet in C by Yunhee Min & TOLO Architecture

How old is your business?

Peter first established the office in 1998 when it was called Peter Tolkin Architecture. Sarah joined the office in 2016, and in 2018 we renamed the office TOLO Architecture: an ironic nickname that incorporates both of our names.

How big is your team ?

We are seven at the moment. Our ideal size is to be 8 to 10 people. We have a large space that can comfortably accommodate 14-16 people, so space is not an issue for us.

TOLO Travel Office Vacation Hiking and Site Tour in Ojai, CA

Is your team currently working remotely, in-person, or hybrid?

We are happy to be back in the office. The highly collaborative nature of the office really benefits from us all being together. We also have access to our large shop with table saw and other woodworking equipment, as well as model making tools and equipment including a 3d printer and laser cutter. We are an office that still makes physical models and we also use the shop to prototype furniture and other smaller scale projects.

Sturdy paper stools molded from 100% recycled corrugated pulp. Photographer: Peter Tolkin

Describe the neighborhood in which your business is located.

We are located at the intersection of Little Tokyo, Arts District, Skid Row and Industrial District. For those familiar with the area, we are approximately one block south of Inner-City Arts, one block west of The Row, and a few blocks north of ICA (Institute of Contemporary Art, LA). It’s an eclectic and complex neighborhood with many issues and disparities, but it’s a place we want to engage and contribute with.

Open office or closed workspaces?

Open office. It’s a space big enough to spread out or rollerblade!

Do you have pets in the office?

We share our space with a painter. Her standard poodle Gilda is a frequent visitor. There are also several alley cats that sunbathe in our parking lot.

Does the team listen to music at work? Headphones or speakers? Who is the typical artist you might hear in the TOLO offices?

Our musical tastes are quite eclectic, ranging from avant-garde, to hip-hop, to jazz, to electronica, to blue-grass, to alternative rock. To avoid a group battle, we use headphones.

Does your team have lunch together?

The TOLO crew often have lunch together on Fridays. New places to eat in the area are popping up every week. Some look promising.

Construction footage of Peter Tolkin’s first project, Saladang Song Restaurant in Pasadena. Photographer: Peter Tolkin

If your business received $1 million to donate to charity, what would it be?

We asked everyone on the board to give their opinion on this issue, responses ranged from support for immigration rights, planned parenthood, feeding hungry children, helping the homeless; especially relevant given our location at the edge of Skid Row.

Tell us about a recent project you completed.

We recently completed an adaptive reuse project of an early 1940s sawtooth-roofed warehouse that has been converted into offices, painting and drawing rooms, conference space and a gallery for artist Charles Sheaths. We are also working on several other projects with Charles Gaines, including the renovation of his house and several large art installations.

Charles Gaines Studio by TOLO Architecture. Photographer: David Hartwell

What position(s) are you currently recruiting for?

We are looking for an intermediate designer, someone with 3-5 years of experience.

What project is this new recruit likely to work on?

At the moment, we are mainly working on arts-related projects (galleries and collaboration with artists) and on tailor-made residential projects. The new hire will work on one or two of these projects alongside other people in the office, including Peter and Sarah.

We believe that the most fundamental architecture has two main concerns: the material (what it looks and feels like) and the social (the activities it encourages). We are looking for our new recruits to help us find interesting and original ways to address these two concerns.

In three words, how would you describe your next Intermediate Designer?

Thoughtful, open-minded, talented

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cohlmeyer architecture transforms an architectural ruin into a furniture store and showroom in montreal https://verandasky.net/cohlmeyer-architecture-transforms-an-architectural-ruin-into-a-furniture-store-and-showroom-in-montreal/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 16:01:26 +0000 https://verandasky.net/cohlmeyer-architecture-transforms-an-architectural-ruin-into-a-furniture-store-and-showroom-in-montreal/ Cohlmeyer architecture transforms abandoned structure into social hub On booming St-Laurent Boulevard in downtown MontrealCohlmeyer Architecture has rejuvenated a neglected building in a vibrant exhibition gallery and furniture retail store. The main concept of the project was to reinvent an architectural ruin into a social gem that benefits both the business and the urban context. […]]]>

Cohlmeyer architecture transforms abandoned structure into social hub

On booming St-Laurent Boulevard in downtown MontrealCohlmeyer Architecture has rejuvenated a neglected building in a vibrant exhibition gallery and furniture retail store. The main concept of the project was to reinvent an architectural ruin into a social gem that benefits both the business and the urban context. Behind a facade of reclaimed bricks, an oasis of greenery unfolds, inviting visitors to enter the store. The whole project optimizes the opening and allows a maximum contribution of natural light to the interiors. Generous amounts of glazing envelop the entire building, also providing a clear visual connection to a forecourt.

the city required that the building’s existing facade facing the street be retained and restored as part of the development approval process

all images by Cohlmeyer Architecture

integrate an urban forecourt garden

With this project, the architects wanted to breathe new life into a historic and bustling district of Montreal, for the mutual benefit of the project and the city. The original building comprised nearly 19,000 square feet over three full floors, a fourth level at the rear of the property, and a shallow basement.

The structure incorporates an urban forecourt garden that serves as both a pocket garden for the neighborhood and an iconic threshold for the retail showroom. To achieve this, approximately 40 feet (12 meters) of the depth of the building was dug. The client wanted to transform the dilapidated and shallow basement into a functional showroom space, thus recovering part of the ground surface devoted to the forecourt. The fourth level serves as an office.

Each long floor of the showroom is pierced with floor-to-ceiling openings allowing all levels of the showroom to have visible access to the garden. The architects kept part of the garden empty to let natural light flood inside. As for the plan, each interior space is stripped down to the maximum to ensure a spacious open layout without partitions.

an architectural ruin transforms into a high-end furniture boutique and showroom in bustling montreal
an urban green space

“The end result looks simple and is the result of many different approaches to solving the joining of materials, edges, spaces and light. Details were designed, built, then taken apart to be rebuilt, the same way furniture is designed. Similar to Scarpa’s approach, we were in conversation with the trades at the start of production and learned methods or processes that would inform a solution that would not have been possible without collaboration,” comments the studio.

an architectural ruin transforms into a high-end furniture boutique and showroom in bustling montreal
an intricate ceiling adds to the space without competing with furniture

an architectural ruin transforms into a high-end furniture boutique and showroom in bustling montreal
architects apply simple gestures to raw materials to create luxury retail space

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Venice Architecture Biennale 2023 as a workshop of hope https://verandasky.net/venice-architecture-biennale-2023-as-a-workshop-of-hope/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 11:34:57 +0000 https://verandasky.net/venice-architecture-biennale-2023-as-a-workshop-of-hope/ “To have hope is to be profoundly human”: this is probably one of the most important statements that curator Lesley Lokko made during the presentation of the 18th International Architecture Exhibition, for the Biennale of architecture of Venice, significantly titled The laboratory of the future. Listening to the words spoken by Lokko, who is an […]]]>

“To have hope is to be profoundly human”: this is probably one of the most important statements that curator Lesley Lokko made during the presentation of the 18th International Architecture Exhibition, for the Biennale of architecture of Venice, significantly titled The laboratory of the future. Listening to the words spoken by Lokko, who is an established Ghanaian-Scottish architect and scholar as well as a narrative writer, this exhibition promises to connect the local to the universal in a very inclusive perspective, without leaving us hopeless even in these hard times. .




View of the Arsenal Image: Andreavezzù, courtesy of La Biennale di Venezia


Lokko is a graduate of the Bartlett School of Architecture in London and holds a doctorate in architecture from the University of London. She has taught at several renowned institutions in the United States, Europe, Africa and Australia, while receiving numerous prestigious awards and assignments around the world. In 2015, she founded the Graduate School of Architecture at the University of Johannesburg, South Africa. In 2019, she was appointed Dean of the Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture in New York, a position from which she resigned in 2020 to found the African Futures Institute in Accra, Ghana, a graduate school aimed at promoting an interdisciplinary approach. architectural research.



Interior view of the central pavilion of the Giardini |  Lesley Lokko |  The Laboratory of the Future |  Venice Architecture Biennale |  Venice Architecture Biennale 2023 |  STIRworld
Interior view of the central pavilion of the Giardini Image: Andreavezzù, courtesy of La Biennale di Venezia


While waiting to visit the exhibition which will be open from May 20 to November 26, 2023 between Giardini, Arsenale and other places located in the city of Venice, Italy, it is already clear that the focus will be on a very specific: the African continent, with all the complexities it represents not only for itself, but also for all of humanity. In fact, says Lokko, there is no doubt that “according to anthropology, we are all Africans”, but that is not the only reason why Africa is the place we should look back at. the times in which we live. At the start of the pandemic, inequalities as well as social and geopolitical tensions deepen and become increasingly evident: one of the two global issues that have emerged in recent decades, decolonization and decarbonization, inevitably converges towards Africa. Africa is best known for being the youngest continent on our planet and, when it comes to architecture, it should come as no surprise that it is also considered the territory with the fastest growing urbanization. This often leads to side effects due to the frequent lack of planning, but still makes Africa the most dynamic place in the world also in this area. According to Lokko, Africa is definitely where the future starts from, and “what happens in Africa, happens to all of us”.



View of the Arsenal |  Lesley Lokko |  The Laboratory of the Future |  Venice Architecture Biennale |  Venice Architecture Biennale 2023 |  STIRworld
View of the Arsenal Image: Andreavezzù, courtesy of La Biennale di Venezia


It is obvious that it is necessary to overcome the misunderstandings due to centuries of Eurocentrism, as Roberto Cicutto, President of La Biennale di Venezia also underlined in his introduction: while we listen to a quote from the lectio magistralis originally given by Umberto Eco at the inauguration of Expo Milano in 2015, it is almost impossible not to reflect on the magnitude of the world’s fairs, and even the Venice Biennale itself, which show a Eurocentric dynamic in the form of pavilions for a very long time. Lesley Lokko, thanks to more than thirty years of experience in the fields of research and education crossing different cultural contexts, embodies the possibility of a mutual dialogue between Europe and what is undoubtedly the majority of the world. humanity, if we finally leave behind the Eurocentric perspective and treat the rest of the world as it deserves.



View of the Arsenale quay |  Lesley Lokko |  The Laboratory of the Future |  Venice Architecture Biennale |  Venice Architecture Biennale 2023 |  STIRworld
View of the Arsenale docks area Image: Andreavezzù, courtesy of La Biennale di Venezia


This dialogue does not exclusively concern the different cultural and geographical contexts, but also the disciplines. During the presentation, eloquent slides parade behind the curator: from the modern conception of “carnival” developed by the Russian philosopher Michail Bakhtin, to a famous quote on the urgency of climate change contrasted by Barack Obama, Lokko demonstrates the ability to connect many references to each other while following the direction of a common and meaningful goal.



(L) Installation during the 2021 Venice Architecture Biennale, (R) The Craftman by Richard Sennett |  Lesley Lokko |  The Laboratory of the Future |  Venice Architecture Biennale |  Venice Architecture Biennale 2023 |  STIRworld
(L) Installation during the 2021 Venice Architecture Biennale, (R) The Craftman by Richard Sennett Image: Courtesy of Andrea Havezù_Courtesy of La Biennale di Venezia


Among many other references, the most representative is the notion of “workshop” theorized by the American sociologist Richard Sennett. “Workshop” is at the heart of “The Craftsman”, one of Sennett’s most important essays, and explains well the title chosen by Lokko for this Biennale. The noun “laboratory” recalls the field of modern science, where laboratories are mostly spaces that end up being separated and even isolated from the surrounding context, while the “workshop”, according to Sennett, is not only a physical space, but also a relational space where the community can meet and reconnect between people and disciplines, as has already happened in ancient cultures such as Greek and Chinese. Since we are in Venice, a city where architecture and craftsmanship have often been deeply linked and have led to extraordinary results, we also ask Lokko what role does craftsmanship have in the relationship between ‘race’, ‘culture’ and ‘space’, the three key words with which his architecture biennial begins. not just a place where you come to do things, it’s also a place where you come to make ideas,” replies Lokko, and this answer can only make us even more curious to know what this exhibition will look like. “complex, but necessary”.



Giardini at the 2021 Venice Architecture Biennale |  Lesley Lokko |  The Laboratory of the Future |  Venice Architecture Biennale |  Venice Architecture Biennale 2023 |  STIRworld
Giardini at the 2021 Venice Architecture Biennale Image: Andreavezzù, courtesy of La Biennale di Venezia


When we then asked Lokko how we could bring the incredible interdisciplinarity that characterizes African architecture into relation with European humanism, she replied that it was definitely time “to think beyond the narrow borders of architecture, landscape, town planning”. This means that the African perspective could help us all to rethink and “broaden” our vision not only with regard to the more specific field of architecture, but also to broader global issues.

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Triple celebration for Cork at the Architecture Oscars https://verandasky.net/triple-celebration-for-cork-at-the-architecture-oscars/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://verandasky.net/triple-celebration-for-cork-at-the-architecture-oscars/ From a family to a parish to an entire city, there will be three celebrations in Cork this weekend as three designs in the rebel county topped the prestigious Irish Architecture Awards. A purpose-built office at the end of a garden, University College Cork’s Honan Chapel and the whole town of Cobh have won awards […]]]>

From a family to a parish to an entire city, there will be three celebrations in Cork this weekend as three designs in the rebel county topped the prestigious Irish Architecture Awards.

A purpose-built office at the end of a garden, University College Cork’s Honan Chapel and the whole town of Cobh have won awards from the Royal Institute of the Architects of Ireland (RIAI).

The awards, given annually, recognize achievement in architecture and celebrate the quality of work performed by RIAI members and the contribution of registered architects to the built environment.

Casement Square: Cobh Public Realm Urban Design Plan.

The RIAI announced 18 winners in 13 categories, at a ceremony at the Museum of Literature Ireland on Thursday evening.

The Honan Chapel Conservation project by FMP Architects.
The Honan Chapel Conservation project by FMP Architects.

HONAN CHAPEL

The Honan Chapel Conservation Project, by FMP Architects, won gold in the adaptation and reuse category.

It also won first prize in the climate change category, with the jury judging the project as ‘a testament to the wealth of exceptional craftsmanship and conservation skills that can be found in Ireland today’.

The Honan Chapel Conservation project by FMP Architects.
The Honan Chapel Conservation project by FMP Architects.

“Once again, the awards showcased architects’ commitment to climate change, as evidenced by strong competition in the competitive adaptation and reuse of our existing buildings,” said Charlotte Sheridan. , President of the RIAI.

Cobh Public Realm Urban Design Plan.
Cobh Public Realm Urban Design Plan.

COBH URBAN DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Cobh’s collaborative ‘people first’ approach to urban design has earned it a podium spot in the Urban Design and Master Planning category for projects from Cork County Council, Capital Projects Department .

The other winner in this category was the Ramelton project, Co Donegal, by Dedalus Architecture.

Plans by Cork County Council to improve the design of Cobh town center also won second prize at the prestigious RIAI Public Choice Awards.

Cobh’s design aims to make the town center more user-friendly and inclusive, introducing greener streets with over 80 new trees, a new park, rainwater garden and sustainable urban drainage to boost biodiversity.

The master plan frees up space for outdoor events and includes 50% more seating as well as space for over 200 bikes.

Cork County Council has worked closely with the local community to design what it describes as “a holistic vision for Cobh that promotes compact growth in the city centre”.

The RIAI hailed Cobh’s design as an “example” in creating sustainable communities.

She added that the project highlights the important role local government architects play in creating desirable and attractive town centres.

County Cork Mayor Cllr Danny Collins said: “These are wonderful awards for the town of Cobh. In particular, it is an honor to be chosen by the public as one of the two best architectural projects in the country.

“The award-winning design is the result of huge collaboration between the various departments of Cork County Council, elected members, external stakeholders, specialist consultants and, most importantly, the local community. These exciting downtown projects aim to breathe additional life into Cobh and create a more attractive place to live, work, visit and invest.

Cork County Council chief executive Tim Lucey added: “It’s a tremendous achievement to win both the judges’ award and to be so highly rated by the public in a national competition.”

The garden room at Douglas.  Photo: Celeste Burdon
The garden room at Douglas. Photo: Celeste Burdon

DOUGLAS GARDEN OFFICE

Simply Architecture in Douglas, Cork, owned by Gareth Sullivan, won a Workplace and Fit-Out award.

It has had illustrious companions in the category, the other two winners being Bottleworks by Henry J Lyons, Dublin, and Le Cheile Education Center by Taka Architects.

RIAI President Charlotte Sheridan presents the award to Siobhan Keogh, Peter Luddy, Paul Higgisson and Gareth Sullivan of Simply Architecture.

RIAI President Charlotte Sheridan presents the award to Siobhan Keogh, Peter Luddy, Paul Higgisson and Gareth Sullivan of Simply Architecture.

The jury judged the Douglas Garden Room office, created by Mr Sullivan during the pandemic closures, as “inspiring”.

“This project tackled the challenge of working from home head-on in a sober and attractive way. The design blends workplace and home seamlessly,” the RIAI said.

A fourth shortlisted Cork project, Horgan’s Quay, phase one, by O’Mahony Pike Architects, received a glowing award.

PRICE

In the Sustainability category, the award went to The Marshall Building, London School of Economics and Political Science by Grafton Architects and The Willows, a house by Peter Nickels Architects.

The winner of the Public Choice award was 10-12 Hanover Quay, Dublin Docklands, by O’Mahony Pike Architects and Mola Architecture.

Shortlisted participants were located in Cork, Carlow, Donegal, Dublin, Wicklow, Kilkenny, Meath and Westmeath, as well as internationally in London and Liverpool, UK, and Chicago, USA.

Ms. Sheridan added: “The quality of entrants was of the highest standard, with the projects delivered in all categories being exemplary in their fields. Irish architects are among the best in the world, helping to solve complex societal problems such as climate change and transforming our public spaces into wonderful places to work and live.”

Cork winners with their RIAI awards.
Cork winners with their RIAI awards.

This year’s awards also recognized Annesley Gardens by Metropolitan Workshop and Middleton Park Gate Lodge by Taka Architects in the highly competitive Living category. The Fanu Skate-BMX and Play Park in Ballyfermot by Enriqueta Llabres Valls won the Public Space Award in recognition of an exemplary project that strongly demonstrates active public space for all ages.

The Wellness Award was presented to the National Forensic Mental Health Service in Portrane by Scott Tallon Walker Architects in association with Medical Architecture.

The Universal Design Award – supported by the Center of Excellence in Universal Design – has been awarded to India Buildings in Liverpool by Falconer Chester Hall.

Castletymon Library by Henchion + Reuter Architects won cultural/public building award; the international prize — supported by Enterprise Ireland — was awarded to the Marshall Building, London School of Economics and Political Science by Grafton Architects; the Ratoath College extension by McGarry Ní Éanaigh Architects won first prize for learning environments. In the Research category, Denise Murray’s Restorative Practice in association with CoLab was crowned the winner.

For more details on awards see www.riai.ie

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