Architecture – Veranda Sky http://verandasky.net/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 20:11:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://verandasky.net/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/icon-2022-01-31T140001.588-150x150.png Architecture – Veranda Sky http://verandasky.net/ 32 32 The history of architecture in 100 buildings https://verandasky.net/the-history-of-architecture-in-100-buildings/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 17:50:08 +0000 https://verandasky.net/the-history-of-architecture-in-100-buildings/ A recent estimate claims that there are 4.732 billion buildings on Earth, but establishing a credible methodology for counting them is difficult. Is Manhattan’s Rockefeller Center, created out of boastful pride and ambition, in the same category as a slum within an Algerian slum? Unless you live in a desert, buildings are a must, making […]]]>

A recent estimate claims that there are 4.732 billion buildings on Earth, but establishing a credible methodology for counting them is difficult. Is Manhattan’s Rockefeller Center, created out of boastful pride and ambition, in the same category as a slum within an Algerian slum? Unless you live in a desert, buildings are a must, making architecture not only a necessity for survival, but also the most meaningful art form.

When I was little, I wanted to be an architect. Not because I cared about emptying schedules, load paths, wrangling with local authorities or designing kitchen extensions, but because architecture seemed the most powerful expression of style. We know and judge cultures by their monuments, not by their ease in performing credit default swaps. And the pinnacle of any culture is expressed in the best buildings in history: New York in the mid-twentieth century, Victorian Britain, the Florence of the Medici, and so on.

Back when I was in school, the way to master all of this was a horrible brick from a book by Banister Fletcher called A history of architecture on the comparative method. Ugly designs were printed on coated paper that smelled bad. Fletcher was a deterrent to all but messianic enlistees. The student-lover of buildings today is more likely to have the knowledge of Witold Rybczynski The history of architecture. It is a calm, courteous and intelligent book. But the title makes an embarrassed nod to the superb film by EH Gombrich art historywhich has had 16 editions since 1950. Is the implicit ambition justified?

Rybczynski was born in Edinburgh but moved to Canada, where he taught at McGill. He is currently Professor Emeritus of Architecture at the University of Pennsylvania. Since 1986, when his House became a surprise best-seller, it was something of a celebrity in the United States, despite the New York Times‘s review finding that this hymn to domesticity had “little analytical penetration of its main notions”.

Rybczynski had previously published on the social impact of technology, but House defended the primacy of comfort in domestic architecture. Comfort is to architecture what justice is to law, he said. He demonizes Le Corbusier, the darling of hard edge modernism, and sanctifies the cozy. For this, the New York Times mentioned “moral laziness and bad taste”. Unquestionably, Rybczynski was advancing his point of view as a revisionist of a history of architecture which, until around 1986, had been written mainly by modernists. This is therefore the context of the major follow-up which is The history of architecture.

Here he is not looking at 4.732 billion buildings, but 100, starting with the Cairn of Barnenez in Brittany from 4800 BC and ending more or less with Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim in Bilbao from 1997, with Palladio, Kyoto and Corbusier between the two. . This approach is completely at odds with what he sadly wrote in looking around (1992): “The history of architecture might now be described not as the study of all significant buildings but as the study of the work of a relatively small number of architects” – but that is exactly what he did. Sportingly, he admits to having visited only half of his sample.

Nonetheless, it’s a book with deep stacks of knowledge supporting a facade of avuncular charm. He has so much human warmth that even slightly cold reproaches seem out of place. But two factoids bothered me as they may indicate hidden structural flaws. In his rather lengthy discussion of the Prussian neo-classical architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel, Rybczysnki seems unaware that his stripped-down classicism was influenced as much by the factories and warehouses of Manchester as by antiquity. And Norman Foster’s career breakthrough came with the glass-walled Wills Faber building in Ipswich, completed four years before his less sensational 1974 Norwich Sainsbury Center, which Rybczynski mightily extended.

Nothing reveals our collective state of mind better than architecture. Today, we are left with a mixture of the city’s phallomorphic Mars Bars, lived in for 25 years, quaint suburban pastiches, and weird features wherever anyone can afford them. The fact that the new United States Embassy in London is surrounded by a medieval moat is indicative of American psychology.

Gombrich had his weaknesses. In art history there were no women or strangers, and he really stuck to the canon pretty much. Rybczynski did not aim for any kind of completeness in The history of architecture, which is a great conversation, not an academic or encyclopedic investigation. I think what he wants to do is pacify the style wars with a book that is neither dogmatic nor doctrinaire but lovingly explains why great architecture moves and impresses us, whatever the style.

It’s a nice starter. The photographs are well chosen and pleasantly evocative. But that’s not saying anything new, so an opportunity was missed. It is surely time to find new typologies, so that we can have a global view of these buildings of more than four billion dollars. In a lecture to the Liverpool Philosophical Society in 1811, Thomas Rickman defined the types of church architecture, just as his contemporary Luke Howard defined the types of clouds, with a system still valid today. Simon Jenkins once joked that “Buggers’ Regency” should become a style brand. Colin Rowe advanced “Ranchburger” as a description of a particular type of American home (later brought up by Tom Wolfe). Personally, I have often thought that ‘Clapham Common’ was a good descriptor of a certain attitude towards building design. There are still many architectural stories to be written.

Offer ends in:

${days} days ${hours} hours ${minutes} minutes ${seconds} seconds

Black Friday: Get a free bottle of Johnnie Walker Black Label

When you subscribe to The viewer for just £12. Sale ends Monday

CLAIM

By the end of the book, I was still unclear about Rybczynski’s argument. Is successful architecture a question of longevity, structure, design, taste or style? Are buildings famous because they are big or big because they are famous? He concludes with an admiring note on Rice University’s 2020 Brockman Hall for Opera Houston. Here, architect Allan Greenberg orchestrates the laying of elaborate brickwork, using herringbone, pinwheel and basket-weave ties, as well as pointed, curved porticoes and window pediments. To me, it looks like a historicist mess. But I admit I haven’t actually seen it, so maybe I should withhold judgment until I’m sure what impression it makes. During this time, Rybczynski also did not see the Great Mosque of Kairouan.

]]>
A deep dive into the vernacular architecture of Ladakh that honors intergenerational memories https://verandasky.net/a-deep-dive-into-the-vernacular-architecture-of-ladakh-that-honors-intergenerational-memories/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 03:35:11 +0000 https://verandasky.net/a-deep-dive-into-the-vernacular-architecture-of-ladakh-that-honors-intergenerational-memories/ With Ladakh Sarai there is a 12 meter drop from one end to the other. In the 1980s, when it was home to British hikers, it was simply farmland. It is this senatorial view of the Sarai and other traditional houses such as Nurugu that ensures that the eye line always brushes the fields of […]]]>

With Ladakh Sarai there is a 12 meter drop from one end to the other. In the 1980s, when it was home to British hikers, it was simply farmland.

It is this senatorial view of the Sarai and other traditional houses such as Nurugu that ensures that the eye line always brushes the fields of barley and wheat. However, the belief that wood, poplars and willows somehow originated in the Ladakhi landscape, say Patel and Khan, is wrong. “However, if we were using cement for structures that can’t be built until March,” Khan says, “then using water would be a nightmare because the cement would crack and workers’ hands would freeze. Why use cement when it clearly doesn’t work, even logistically in Ladakh?”

Khan adds that the design language of Ladakh is intergenerational, not only in the sense of personal memories, but also in the historical echoes of the Ladakh landscape. “Due to the geological displacement of the Tethys Sea several millennia ago, the seabed actually rose, as did the round stones, which were traditionally used. These are sluts or round river rocks which are basically igneous rocks that we used in the Sarai.

The sweep of a Ladakhi landscape is minimalist yet grand.

Preserving Memories

In one of Ladakh’s most remote villages, Lingshed in the Zanskar Valley, the homes of three nomadic herders are now marked only by stones and boulders. Their massive tents have now given way to a deep gorge running through their ancient ancestral land. Poplars and willows are still the trees which are mainly used for timber production in Leh and Ladakh. It is only in the past 50 years that tree plantations have been more widely implemented in accordance with Indian national regulations.

“After a while there’s not much you can do,” says Dawa Tsering, who claims to be 105, his assertive words in Ladakhi with a distinct Boti accent, gracefully translated by his grandson who is enlisted in the Indian Army. . “After every two years, a new river dries up and another muddy river floods our villages, so you submit to the whims of the gods, always confident that Yul-ha (guardian deity) will always support us.”

]]>
the secluded forest cabin by scalar architecture soars slightly above sloping ground in Connecticut https://verandasky.net/the-secluded-forest-cabin-by-scalar-architecture-soars-slightly-above-sloping-ground-in-connecticut/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 11:56:27 +0000 https://verandasky.net/the-secluded-forest-cabin-by-scalar-architecture-soars-slightly-above-sloping-ground-in-connecticut/ Forest Retreat by Scalar Architecture Nestled in a lush forest Connecticut, this Scalar Architecture retreat is home to a family of writers with a minimal environmental footprint. The structure is located in a remote location accessible only on foot or by light commercial vehicles and takes the form of a dark green cabin hovering above […]]]>

Forest Retreat by Scalar Architecture

Nestled in a lush forest Connecticut, this Scalar Architecture retreat is home to a family of writers with a minimal environmental footprint. The structure is located in a remote location accessible only on foot or by light commercial vehicles and takes the form of a dark green cabin hovering above the rocky, sloping terrain. Large openings allow residents to connect deeply with nature, while the concave roof the surface collects water and light and controls ventilation, making it an efficient and comfortable space living environment.

the dark green cabin hovers above the sloping ground | all images courtesy of Imagen Subliminal (Miguel de Guzmán + Rocío Romero)

a floating box with a concave roof

Approaching the 1,200-square-foot (111 m²) cabin, occupants ascend a short flight of stairs to a semi-screened southeast-facing porch. From here one accesses the interior, which consists of multi-level living and dining areas, two bedrooms and an attic. Several large openings are cut into the floating box, which adapts to the lush sloping terrain. One of these openings is the concave roof, which captures water and light while guiding ventilation and allowing residents to view the surrounding landscape.

In addition to the pier foundations and leaf-resistant cladding, Scalar Architecture’s Forest Cabin (read more here) is constructed entirely of wood and is heavily insulated with durable materials. The openings are oriented towards sunlight from the south, winter winds from the north and northeast, and the local summer wind from the southwest.

the secluded forest cabin by scalar architecture soars slightly above sloping ground in Connecticut
the structure lightly touches the rocky landscape

the secluded forest cabin by scalar architecture soars slightly above sloping ground in Connecticut
apart from the pier foundation and leaf-resistant cladding, the building is constructed entirely of wood

the secluded forest cabin by scalar architecture soars slightly above sloping ground in Connecticut
approaching the cabin, occupants find a small staircase that leads inside

]]>
Solid timber solution speeds construction of new Oakleigh day care center https://verandasky.net/solid-timber-solution-speeds-construction-of-new-oakleigh-day-care-center/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 21:35:27 +0000 https://verandasky.net/solid-timber-solution-speeds-construction-of-new-oakleigh-day-care-center/ The Oakleigh South Daycare Center is a perfect example of how mass timber meets the needs of the education sector. Designed by Insite Architects, Oakleigh South Childcare Center is constructed primarily using XLAM (CLT) cross-laminated timber panels, with the aesthetics of natural wood in this biophilic interior ideal for supporting the development of young children. […]]]>

The Oakleigh South Daycare Center is a perfect example of how mass timber meets the needs of the education sector.

Designed by Insite Architects, Oakleigh South Childcare Center is constructed primarily using XLAM (CLT) cross-laminated timber panels, with the aesthetics of natural wood in this biophilic interior ideal for supporting the development of young children.

Responding to the client’s need for accelerated construction as well as the integration of biophilic design features, XLam worked with the prime contractor and architect to carefully orchestrate the sequencing, shop drawings, and fabrication of approximately 260 CLT panels.

The project has benefited tremendously from the use of XLam CLT with benefits such as lighter building foundations, high material accuracy through factory prefabrication, and a smaller site construction team. Off-site prefabrication allowed for faster assembly, which reduced the structural construction program to less than two weeks, allowing for earlier occupancy and shorter-term financing requirements.

Thanks to the massive wooden construction, the construction had improved durability factors. In addition to virtually no waste on site, environmental impact has been reduced with minimal foundation work due to the lightweight nature of CLT. The project received the Best Sustainable Project 2018 award from the Master Builders Association of Victoria.

Structural design

XLam’s scope included shop drawings, construction sequencing, as well as fabricating CLT walls and a roof structure for the purpose-built daycare center. The owners were looking for an accelerated construction phase and a result that incorporated a wooden aesthetic to capitalize on the well-known wellness benefits of biophilic design.

Consisting of eight individual age-based educational rooms, a parent retreat, reception, office, as well as a full commercial kitchen and laundry room, the center required approximately 310 m³ of CLT for walls and roof structure.

At the time of this project, XLam exclusively imported CLT panels into Australia from its factory in Nelson, New Zealand. Therefore, the logistics of this project required special attention. It was not only necessary to ensure complete precision during the manufacturing process of the precast panels, but also in the process of quickly and meticulously shipping the panels by ocean freight to the site, to ensure that the project met the construction schedule. tight.

The center walls, including the outer shell, room dividers and high corridor walls were constructed with 105mm thick CLT, while the thickness of CLT used for the roof varied between 105 mm and 150 mm, depending on the span. All XLam CLT panels used in the project were constructed from untreated Radiata pine planks. A total of 257 individually pre-fabricated CLT panels were installed, with the structure completed in just 11 days.

Results

Thanks to the efficiency and speed of the CLT construction, XLam was able to meet the owner’s specifications for an accelerated construction incorporating biophilic design, while simultaneously receiving recognition for the project’s sustainability with the Best Sustainable award. Master Builders Association of Victoria Project 2018.

project details

Project: Oakleigh South Childcare Center

Client: Hume Childcare Trust

Architect: Insite Architects

Structural engineer: Vistek

Main Contractor: Workshop Projects

Location: Oakleigh South, Victoria, Australia

Construction method: solid wood (CLT)

]]>
Principles of good practice adopted for the Alloa traveler community: November 2022: News: Architecture in profile the building environment in Scotland https://verandasky.net/principles-of-good-practice-adopted-for-the-alloa-traveler-community-november-2022-news-architecture-in-profile-the-building-environment-in-scotland/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 10:06:55 +0000 https://verandasky.net/principles-of-good-practice-adopted-for-the-alloa-traveler-community-november-2022-news-architecture-in-profile-the-building-environment-in-scotland/ November 22, 2022 A Clackmannanshire Traveler community of 16 families is to be upgraded to current living standards as part of a comprehensive package of improvements including eight blocks of replacement amenities, a community center and the provision of storage safe for butane gas. Led by Austin-Smith:Lord, the Westhaugh transformation project was initiated by the […]]]>

November 22, 2022

A Clackmannanshire Traveler community of 16 families is to be upgraded to current living standards as part of a comprehensive package of improvements including eight blocks of replacement amenities, a community center and the provision of storage safe for butane gas.

Led by Austin-Smith:Lord, the Westhaugh transformation project was initiated by the local authority and HUB East Central Scotland, with a mission to improve the quality of life for residents.

With the full support of the residents, who have temporarily relocated while the construction works last, the interventions include the provision of a new play park, the disposal of communal waste and the reconfiguration of the grounds according to fire guidelines .

Located near Alloa, the rural caravan park suffers from mold growth, no pedestrian access and an inefficient electric hot water supply.

Describing their chosen design solution, the architects wrote: “The amenity block design takes a simple form of low-pitched roofs with gabled walls at each end. There is a contrasting porch intervention which is partially recessed and extruded to help delineate the entrance and provide covered shelter which was a key requirement of the residents.

“Inside, the main social spaces are full-height and extend to the central ridge of the party wall, representing a larger space for compact amenity footprints. The community center adopts the same characteristics as amenity blocks using the same roof pitch, materials and details.

“To represent a greater presence on the site, the form is larger in scale and more striking in form as it extends from the ridge into the ground, helping to form a common south-facing terrace and screen to the community garden. “

Each property will be clad with a Thermopine wood rainscreen under a corrugated steel or fiber cement roof. Individual entrances will be defined by a corten or contrasting zinc porch.

Matching roofs and walls are meant to be sympathetic to the rural setting

Matching roofs and walls are meant to be sympathetic to the rural setting

Arrangements are made for the planting of wildflowers as part of the program

Arrangements are made for the planting of wildflowers as part of the program


]]>
Losing a City, One Bad Building at a Time – Development and Architecture https://verandasky.net/losing-a-city-one-bad-building-at-a-time-development-and-architecture/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 23:09:26 +0000 https://verandasky.net/losing-a-city-one-bad-building-at-a-time-development-and-architecture/ Why don’t developers, on their own initiative and without civic coercion, offer the city beautiful buildings? FRIEND DOUG CURRAN recently sent me a link to a promotional video from the mid-1950s (or whatever they called videos back then) highlighting GM’s new line of cars. Produced in Hollywood musical style, it featured a song and dance […]]]>

Why don’t developers, on their own initiative and without civic coercion, offer the city beautiful buildings?

FRIEND DOUG CURRAN recently sent me a link to a promotional video from the mid-1950s (or whatever they called videos back then) highlighting GM’s new line of cars. Produced in Hollywood musical style, it featured a song and dance number:

Tomorrow Tomorrow

Our dreams will come true.

together together

We will make the world new.

The hopeful fusion of new car ownership and happiness is delivered without a shred of marketing cynicism, and what makes it breathtaking is not its mindless consumerism, but its optimism and its unbridled and genuine idealism, even: possibility itself – the “world made new” – as a declaration of hope pushed to the horizon; practically a guarantee of happy outcomes and a reason why that smile never leaves It was the promise – it seems to you that the promise itself was the emotional chassis of the company – that comes with every Chevy, as certain as the new car shines on the hood.

I swear you can’t watch the promo without being scratched by meaning, by a rush of longing for so much joy, for so much… revival.

The new car, of course, sat in the driveway of a suburban rancher. The whole thing was moving away from the miseries and frictions of city-dwelling and social (and racial) attrition and towards an unconstrained frontier, with no minus symbol at its bow. The entire painting was painted in shades of white. Dad was working. Mom cooked. Billy and Little Suzie did well. Everyone knew the rules. There was rules back then, not like the free-for-all today, damn it!

All of this followed the lamentations of a generation weary of war and depression, of a generation of immigrants or children of immigrants. Life at this point was a battle, everything was a battle. Nothing was easy, lubricated. Nothing was flowing.

You can imagine the joys of something starring dynaflow“Buick, if I remember correctly.

This promise of 50s flow and future spanned just a heartbeat of history and, in footsteps and lurches too familiar and daunting to note here, deposited us in front of titles like this of October 5. New York Times: “‘Civil war’ talk erupts, sparked by search for Mar-a-Lago”:

Shortly after the FBI searched Donald J. Trump’s Florida home for classified documents, online researchers zeroed in on a disturbing trend.

“Social media posts that mentioned the ‘Civil War’ soared nearly 3,000% in just hours as Mr Trump’s supporters called the action a provocation.

“Polls and studies suggest that a growing number of Americans anticipate, even welcome, the possibility of sustained political violence.”

Elsewhere, the Time observes: “According to Gallup, 56% of Americans disapprove of the work President Biden is doing. About 80% say the country is on the wrong track.

It is not my purpose here to dwell on the United States of today or tomorrow, or even the lighter challenges and dangers here in Canada, but to make the connection between the social mood and cultural production and outcomes.

That is to say that hope is culture and finds its way not only into political and economic forms of social practice, but also finds unmistakable expression in the arts, and particularly in architecture and urban design. Literature, visual arts, dance are somewhat ephemeral; the buildings, however, tend to remain ostensibly, and long after, the social barometer has changed.

Let me give it all a local twist. There’s a column I wrote about how I wish Victoria Mayor Lisa Helps would have stood up in front of the property developers (with a loud echo of the architects) and said something like, “You want height and density? Then give the city distinctive and beautiful buildings.

There is a question lurking inside: why should the mayor have done it? Why don’t developers, on their own initiative and without civic coercion, offer the city beautiful buildings? Why is this not a reflex behavior? Leaving room for the possibility that most developers just have shitty taste, why aren’t they awash in idealism and ego: “I’m going to put together something so beautiful that it makes me proud and puts everything else in town to shame!” That sort of thing.

In practice, part of the answer is that there is no development school with compulsory courses in “building citizenship” – buildings as civic investment. Our society doesn’t ask developers or owners where we’re going or who we want to be (or it does, and the response is disappointing). How, for example, can each new building convey a quality of welcome? How, through our buildings, do we prolong social harmony and optimism? How can each new building give passers-by a sense of hope and well-being? Why doesn’t every new building say, “You’re home, you’re safe here”? These concerns are not really the abstractions that they seem. We all share pretty much the same visual instincts; and besides, Victoria is a city full of architectural critics.

The Jawls, in an extraordinary and enduring collaboration with architect Franc D’Ambrosio (Santiago Calatrava de Victoria), have, almost by reflex, created distinctive and superior buildings and former industrial communities throughout Victoria. Ditto Chris LeFevre (LeFevre and Company—Railyards, several Old Town redevelopments). Mosaic Properties partners Don Charity and Fraser McColl have added architectural value and beauty to every project they have undertaken. The list is longer than these few names, but they are the ones that stand out. Their vision for the project extends beyond the development pro forma and seems, in a way, to embody the understanding that each new building impacts – enriches or impoverishes – the history of this place, our history.

I have a mean, ungenerous theory about Victoria. The reason there’s so much back-puffing and enthusiastic noise around community instances is that there’s so little community here. Community is not simply contiguity or protection of way of life, but a larger shared purpose and action; sacrifice, sometimes. If there were more, there would be less applause. I don’t blame us locals; the common purpose suffers everywhere.

What is the most consistent response, as people comment on the emerging new identity of downtown? “Now Victoria looks like every other city.”

With this comment, no one yearns for the return of “a bit of old England”. Nobody asks that everything be half-timbered. No, what bothers people is a loss of character and uniqueness, and the loss of a connection between the person and the building.

I repeat that if developers cannot internalize these values ​​on their own, the City needs design guidelines that will do so for them. Believe me (and look around you): despite the municipal vanities, these do not currently exist.

Where could such directives come from? Where could the City find the principles, ideas, poetics, lexicon and phraseology of these brand new design controls?

Why look any further than the endless writings and presentations of locals like architect/planner Chris Gower and architectural historian Martin Segger, who (amongst others) have long advocated for quality, humanity and the originality of the built form.

They may never have been asked how you lose a city, but they would probably answer, “One bad building at a time.”

Gene Miller is currently writing Futurecide˛ a book that argues that disaster is ecological, present and edit the site Shit Sandwich: the Best of the Bad News, and launching the Center for the Design of the Future, a Victoria-based institution host for new answers to old questions.

]]>
The voice of women in Chinese architecture https://verandasky.net/the-voice-of-women-in-chinese-architecture/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 12:30:00 +0000 https://verandasky.net/the-voice-of-women-in-chinese-architecture/ The voice of women in Chinese architecture Bozi Kitchen Museum. Image © Lei Qu To share To share Facebook Twitter Mail pinterest WhatsApp Or https://www.archdaily.com/991882/the-voice-of-women-in-chinese-architecture Women’s studies officially began in China in the early 1980s. Women woke up and began to take on more important roles in society as it grew. Women had worked as […]]]>

The voice of women in Chinese architecture