Close to nature: NZIA Nelson-Marlborough Architecture Award winners

Puponga Bach in Golden Bay, by John Hardwick-Smith of Athfield Architects, has won a housing award as part of the NZIA Nelson-Marlborough Architecture Awards.

Olivier Weber

Puponga Bach in Golden Bay, by John Hardwick-Smith of Athfield Architects, has won a housing award as part of the NZIA Nelson-Marlborough Architecture Awards.

The dramatic landscapes of Nelson and Marlborough are the hero of many of this year’s winning entries for the region’s Te Kāhui Whaihanga New Zealand Institute of Architects architectural awards.

Nelson & Marlborough Jury Chairman Jarrod Midgley of Rural Workshop Architecture said there were strengths among the entries which blended into the scenic surroundings of the Nelson and Marlborough districts.

“All members of the jury were deeply impressed by the caliber of entries this year. Nelson and Marlborough are scenic and tranquil parts of New Zealand, and the winning entries were humble and respectful buildings that showcased the area’s natural beauty.

The exterior of Puponga Bach by Athfield Architects.

Olivier Weber

The exterior of Puponga Bach by Athfield Architects.

Pūponga Bach, a light wooden holiday home in Golden Bay, received an award in the Accommodation category. Led by architect John Hardwick-Smith of Athfield Architects, this bach’s compact size belies its expansive setting of railway embankment, kānuka forest, coast and estuary.

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The elevated linear form of the bach extends into the canopy of trees and the camping terrace below, with a sequence of open spaces along the crest of the escarpment that runs down the center of the house and connects the living spaces.

This room opens directly onto a terrace surrounded by beautiful bushes.

Olivier Weber

This room opens directly onto a terrace surrounded by beautiful bushes.

The Cabin by Small Project Architecture Award winner Johnstone Callaghan Architects is another perfect hideaway, this time nestled in the bush overlooking a small creek in Abel Tasman National Park.

The jury said this durable, low-maintenance gem offers a surprise at every turn. “Designed as a complement to the neighboring family bach, every aspect of The Cabin celebrates the essence of retreat into nature – from an outdoor shower nestled in the trees and a nest-like sleeping area, to the terrace gated and to the treetop viewing platform that maintains a constant connection to the bush beyond.

“Designed and assembled with love and great care, one cannot help but enjoy this earthly, honest, uplifting and spiritual building.”

The cabin by Johnstone Callaghan Architects in the Abel Tasman National Park has a "surprise at every turn".

SAM HARTNETT

Johnstone Callaghan Architects’ cabin in Abel Tasman National Park has a “surprise at every turn”.

Honeymoon Bach by Jerram Tocker Barron Architects, in Honeymoon Bay, Abel Tasman National Park, was also singled out for a Small Project Award.

The jury said the site’s deeply shaded pocket square, set against a cliff and subject to approval by the local residents’ committee, required a courageous design approach.

“By cleverly stretching the envelope vertically, the architect allocated the entire footprint to living and decking, and squeezed two bedrooms and a toilet above. A cleverly cropped master bedroom floor allows sunlight to flood the living room below, giving this homey, simple, well-resolved bach a surprisingly spacious feel.

Honeymoon Bay Bach by Jerram Tocker Barron Architects won a Small Project Architecture Award.

JASON MANN

Honeymoon Bay Bach by Jerram Tocker Barron Architects won a Small Project Architecture Award.

A plywood interior blends into the natural landscape.

JASON MANN

A plywood interior blends into the natural landscape.

Other highlights include the office space of Irving Smith Architect: “In a masterstroke of design, valuable mid- and upper-level floor space is sacrificed to open the studio office onto a continuous verandah facing north, complemented by a generous terrace at the back.

“Naturally ventilated, flooded with daylight and infused with the warmth of exposed solid wood construction, a work environment becomes a practice home full of natural light.”

WallE by Irving Smith Architects' new premises open onto a north-facing balcony.

PATRICK REYNOLDS

WallE by Irving Smith Architects’ new premises open onto a north-facing balcony.

Lodging

  • Puponga Bach by Athfield Architects
  • The Cliff House by Modo Architects

Housing – Changes and Additions

  • Wakefield Quay Apartment by Arthouse Architects.
  • Faith and Doubt by Crosson Architects.
  • Spring Creek revisited by Modo Architects
Spring Creek Revisited by Modo Architects is a winner of the Housing - Alternations and Additions award.

SIMON DEVITT

Spring Creek Revisited by Modo Architects is a winner of the Housing – Alternations and Additions award.

Spring Creek Revisited - Modo Architects also designed the original house for the same owners.

SIMON DEVITT

Spring Creek Revisited – Modo Architects also designed the original house for the same owners.

Commercial

  • WallÉ by Irving Smith Architects.
  • Fairfield Office Low Energy certified by KLT Architects

Education

  • Waimea College New Teaching Blocks by Arthouse Architects and Sheppard & Rout Architects
Blenheim House (1989) by Peter Beaven - Architect won a sustainable architecture award.

Grant Davis

Blenheim House (1989) by Peter Beaven – Architect won a sustainable architecture award.

Sustainable architecture

  • Blenheim House (1989) by Peter Beaven – Architect

Public architecture

  • Marlborough Borough Council – Public Toilet Improvements by Arthouse Architects

Small project architecture

  • Honeymoon Bay Bach by Jerram Tocker Barron Architects
  • The Cabin by Johnstone Callaghan Architects
Waimea College's new teaching blocks in Richmond, by Arthouse Architects and Sheppard & Rout Architects, have won an Education Award and a Resene Color Award.

Virginia Woolf

Waimea College’s new teaching blocks in Richmond, by Arthouse Architects and Sheppard & Rout Architects, have won an Education Award and a Resene Color Award.

Waimea College's new teaching blocks feature engineered wood as a sustainable alternative to concrete and steel.

Virginia Woolf

Waimea College’s new teaching blocks feature engineered wood as a sustainable alternative to concrete and steel.

Resene Color Award Winners

  • Waimea College New Teaching Blocks by Arthouse Architects and Sheppard & Rout Architects
  • Puponga Bach by Athfield Architects
  • Wakefield Quay Apartment by Arthouse Architect

Things

From intricate sculptural designs to small and simple, these are the winners of the 2022 NZIA Housing Award in Canterbury.

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